5G

Mike Wood

With the next generation of wireless technology 5G accelerating at a rapid pace, and Australia playing a key role in global EMF standardisation, this presentation will provide an overview of 5G, how 5G works and the challenges and opportunities ahead in managing Electromagnetic Fields.  

Mike Wood

When: 

Tue, 24 Apr 2018 - 12:30pm AEST

Location: 

Melbourne, VIC

A software-defined radio implementation of polynomial cancellation coded orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (PCC-OFDM)  is presented in this paper. Based on the comparative results obtained on the hardware platform, the properties of PCC-OFDM make it a suitable candidate for consideration in future 55G applications requiring robust performance in asynchronous environments with minimal out of band spectral emissions.

The requirements for 5G are increased download speeds, the need to deal with increased cell density, increased bandwidth efficiency and availability of new bandwidth. 5G is likely to make use of spectrum in the millimetre range, beam-forming antenna arrays, massive Multi-Input Multi-Output, and fundamental changes to base station design. In this paper the key drivers for 5G are discussed including the very large numbers of devices in cells, the need to make available new spectrum, energy efficient ways of implementing base station capabilities, standards developments so far and 5G related issues for Australia.

This article presents our perspectives of the 5G technologies with two major themes: Green and Soft. By rethinking the Shannon theorem and traditional cell-centric design, network capacity can be significantly increased while network power consumption is steady or even decreased

In this article, we show the path of the evolution in both standards and techniques and provide our vision for the future of the cellular networks. We review the evolution of international standards for cellular mobile networks in the last two decades, describe how the network layout has been migrating from rigid cellular architecture to random and dense small cells, and provide an in-depth discussion on potential enabling techniques for the next generation (5G) cellular networks

This article summarises the ?state of play? in 5G by reviewing the requirements that are driving its development, the performance targets it is aiming for and the technologies being explored to achieve these. It also compares the main capabilities of 5G with those of the earlier generations of mobile technology

This editorial notes several key indicators of record growth in Australian telecommunications, as the backdrop to the second issue of this multidisciplinary policy Journal. The growth in social connectivity and ?big data?, together with the rapid evolution of new infrastructure technologies, all pose interesting challenges for good policy making ? and for keeping up with new developments

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